Laboratory methods to study mosquito infections with pathogens.

Speaker: Stephen Higgs, Ph.D. Kansas State University
An often-raised concern for the development of genetically modified mosquito technologies is the limitation of our understanding of mosquito ecology.

This series of webinars will explore mosquito ecology with an emphasis on interspecific interactions.

The speakers will describe methods by which potential interactions that may impact human or animal health and the environment can be examined in the context of case-by-case risk assessment and safety testing.
During each of the 5 meetings 2 speakers will present on related topics followed by a question and answer period.

These webinars will provide valuable information for those considering issues of risk associated with population-suppression and -modification forms of vector control such as gene drive.

Relative potential for harm of pathogens vectored by Anopheles gambiae s.l.

Speaker: Geoff Hosack, Ph.D. CSIRO
An often-raised concern for the development of genetically modified mosquito technologies is the limitation of our understanding of mosquito ecology.

This series of webinars will explore mosquito ecology with an emphasis on interspecific interactions.

The speakers will describe methods by which potential interactions that may impact human or animal health and the environment can be examined in the context of case-by-case risk assessment and safety testing.
During each of the 5 meetings 2 speakers will present on related topics followed by a question and answer period.

These webinars will provide valuable information for those considering issues of risk associated with population-suppression and -modification forms of vector control such as gene drive.

Investigating the independence of stakeholder engagement activities

This is the fifth and last in a series of Panel Discussions—Considering the Case of Gene Drive Technologies Through Social Science Theories on Stakeholder Engagement.
 
Through The Gene Drive Research Forum, The Genetic Biocontrol of Invasive Rodents (GBIRd) Partnership and The FNIH GeneConvene Global Collaborative are co-hosting a series of virtual panel discussions to provide a forum for social scientists, researchers and developers, funders, and other stakeholders engaged in or contemplating work in the gene drive technologies space to explore the case of gene drive technologies through social science theories on stakeholder engagement. A different panel will meet for 1.5 hours on the second Tuesday of each month for five months starting in February 2021 at 10 am US east coast time to discuss a specific topic and entertain questions from participants.